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Edinburgh and Northern Railway

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Edinburgh and Northern Railway

This line is open. The line is also known by its later name the 'Edinburgh, Perth and Dundee Railway'.

Survey To be entered
Engineers To be entered
Act 1845
Contractors To be entered
Opened 17/09/1847
Closed No, save a short section.

Clickable map of the Edinburgh and Northern Railway

Local area

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This line runs through Fife, much of the route through rural farmland. There was coalmining and other industries at Kirkcaldy, Burntisland and Thornton.

Chronology 

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The line was one of the first opened in Fife and became an important part of the through route from Edinburgh to Dundee and Aberdeen, having train ferry connections from Burntisland to Granton (for Edinburgh) and Tayport to Broughty Ferry (for Dundee and Aberdeen). It became part of the North British Railway.

Description of route 

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From Burntisland to Perth and Tayport (now closed). The system forms a large 'Y' shape. 

Burntisland

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From the harbour here train ferries made the crossing to Granton for Edinburgh. Later the line was extended west by the Aberdour line (North British Railway) in connection with the opening of the Forth Bridge Railway, the station at Burntisland was re-built and the train ferries ceased. The dock at Burntisland was enlarged a number of times to accomodate the large export of coal from Fife.

Kinghorn

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Kinghorn station retains its original station building. It is a two platform station perched above the town and sea.

Seafield Colliery

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This colliery was opened in 1960 (first sod cut 12 May 1954), and closd in 1988. The photograph was taken after closure. The rail sidings serving the colliery joined the main line at a south facing junction. The photograph is taken from by the main line, looking north east towards the colliery.

Invertiel Junction

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Invertiel Junction was a south facing junction to the south of Kirkcaldy. It was the end of a relief line for coal and freight traffic from Cowdenbeath - the Kirkcaldy District Railway.

Kirkcaldy

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This is a two platform station with a goods yard at the north end now used for track maintenance.

Kirkcaldy Harbour

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The harbour was reached by a short branch (junction with the main line faced south) which had a severe gradient and turned through 180 degrees to reach the harbour. The branch is closed.

Sinclairtown

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This station is closed.

Dysart

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The station here is closed. To the north was a loop on the east side of the line and the south end of the branch to the Frances Pit.

Frances Pit

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This pit was served by a branch from the main line which came from a south facing junction. The exchange sidings were in the 'v' of the junciton between the main line and the branch. Gravity shunting was employed in the exchange sidings. The pit was locally known as 'the Dubbie' (the pit sunk at Dubbie Braes, a 'dubby' being a rock-pool on the seashore) and operating the line was known as 'the Dubbie Shunt'. The pit opened in 1878 (as the Francis) and was mothballed in 1984 and later closed after plans for extending it under the sea to the Lothians were abandoned. The headframe of the colliery still stands.

Thornton South Junction
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This is a south facing junction with the Dunfermline Branch (Edinburgh and Northern Railway).

Thornton Junction

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There was a station here called 'Thornton Junction' closed in 1969. From here tracks still run west (from a north facing junction)as the Dunfermline Branch of the Edinburgh and Northern Railway, east as (from a south facing junction) as the Leven Railway and formerly east (from a north facing junction) as the Wemyss and Buckhaven Railway. The station site suffered from subsidence due to mining and was re-built on a number of occasions. Just to the south of the station a spur from the Wemyss and Buckhaven Railway passed under the main line and ran west to join the Dunfermline Branch to the east of Thornton.

Markinch

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This is a two platform station. There was a timber shed goods here which for many years was the home of A4 60009 formerly known as "Union of South Africa". The locomotive has not lived here for a few years. The shed was burnt down in 2002. Recently the waiting shelters have been replaced.

This was the junction for the former Leslie Branch which left from a north facing junction at the south end of the station. A number of sidings still exist here and the stump of this line runs as far as the Auchmuty mills. The line is very overgrown and out of use.

Also to the south of the station is a large viaduct.

Lochmuir box

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This box was at a summit of the line. There were refuge loops here.

Falkland Road

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This station is closed. This was a two platform station, parts of the platforms remain. The station building survived here until the early 1990s.

Kingskettle

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This station is closed.

Ladybank

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This station is open. At the north end of the station is the south facing junction between the line to Perth and the line to Dundee. In the 'v' of the junction is the closed locomotive shed, still standing. The station has two platforms (it had a bay platform at the south end of the northbound platform) and traditional North British Railway station buildings. To the south of the station is the former south facing junction with the Fife and Kinross Railway. The line to Perth was singled in the 1930s. The base of the signalbox still stands here in the 'v' of the junction.

Collessie

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This station is closed. It is now a house.

Glenburnie Junction

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This was a west facing junction with the Newburgh and North Fife Railway.

Clatchard Craig loop

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There was a passing loop and siding for Clatchard Craig quarry here. These closed in the 1980s.

Newburgh

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This station is closed. The platforms remain along with the station building and goods shed, both now ruined.

Abernethy

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This station is closed. Very little fo the station remains, but the site of the goods yard remains open and clear.

Bridge of Earn (Old)

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This station is closed.

Bridge of Earn Junction

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This was a west facing junction where the Glenfarg line (North British Railway) joined the line.

Bridge of Earn (New)

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This station is closed.

Hilton Junction

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At this north facing junction, just to the south of Perth and the Moncrieffe Tunnel, the line joins the Scottish Central Railway for access to Perth. There had been plans for the line to cross the Tay somewhere to the east of Perth and approach Perth from the north bank of the Tay, but these were abandoned partly due to opposition from other lines, and the expense of building a bridge over the Tay which vessels could pass under.

As the line approached the junction it turns through more than 90 degrees and passes over a viaduct.

Springfield

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This two platform station is open and retains its station building. To the south of the station, at a north facing junction, the Cults Lime Works Railway branches off. This had a branch to Pitlessie and another to Cults Hill where there was a locomotive shed.

Cupar

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This large station is open. There were formerly three tracks between the platforms, but the central road has been lifted. The goods yard was cleared in the 1990s for a car park. The signalbox here is still open.

Dairsie

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This station is closed. Hints of platforms remain.

Leuchars South Junction

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This junction was also known as Milton Junction. Here the St Andrews Railway joined at a north facing junction.

Leuchars (New)

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Originally known as Leuchars Junction, this station opened with the opening of the The Tay Bridge (North British Railway). The station has a broad island platform approached by a footbridge. The station formerly had a single track bay platform at both the north and south ends.

Leuchars North Junction

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This was a south facing junction with the The Tay Bridge (North British Railway). From here to Tayport the Edinburgh and Northern Railway line has been closed and lifted the Tay Bridge route remaining open. A stub of the route survived until the 1990s to serve a siding of the Leuchars Air base.

Leuchars (Old)

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This station site is now a carpark for a hotel. This was the first Leuchars station and was supplied with south facing bay platforms on the opening of the St Andrews Railway. To the north of the station was a level crossing and signalbox.

Tayport

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This was one of the termii of the line. It served not only Tayport but there was a train ferry over to Broughty Ferry and Dundee. There station was just to the south of the harbour which was served by rail. The harbour and station were separated by a level crossing at which there was a signalbox. The locomotive which went down with the train on the first Tay Bridge was brought up and taken to the harbour here for inspection before being put back into service following repair. The station site is now derelict and some section of rail remain as bollards in the harbour. The line was extended west to meet the south end of the Tay Bridge by the Wormit line.


Page created on 19/01/1998
Page last edited on: 11/09/2011
Contact: Ewan Crawford